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Whats is Happening with adoption in México?

Actualizado: 26 de nov de 2020


Having a registry of children removed from their homes due to family violence, abandonment, and other abuses and why they got there is one of Mexico's critical issues when it comes to adoption. It has not been possible to have a homogeneous legal framework or policies that allow transparency in these processes and bad practices. While this is happening, these children grow up waiting for the National System for Integral Family Development to decide whether to reintegrate them with their biological parents, if they can live with any of their relatives or become candidates to be adopted. This wait can last for years, and children grow up in homes without parental care and lose their chance of being adopted because they are no longer attractive to future parents who want babies or children under seven years of age.

What about children who are sent to a foster home?


Children are placed and cared for by shelters under the standards of children's rights (health, food, education) but not under the essence of a family nucleus, and not all comply with adequate care. Children can spend up to two or more years waiting while their legal situation is decided to see if their mother, father, or close family member took care of them or knew the causes of abandonment. In defining children's legal status, they can be relocated and repeatedly bounced to different homes and schools; consequently, they cannot have any real childhood friends; they have no idea what a social network is. Most importantly, they lose their chance to belong to a family and feel the safety and loving care of a home. The saddest thing is that although many families are interested in adopting and so many children desire it deeply; they cannot be released for adoption for reasons explained above.


Why does this happen?


Management is bureaucratic, and processes are often abandoned as it is challenging to follow up on the process when there are more than 30 thousand abandoned children in this confusing and unfair network. There has been negligence on the part of the courts losing files, and as a result, birth certificates are not processed, and thus many children are, without proper legal assistance, put at risk for any hope for their future. The State abandons, forgets, and fails to manage these cases to locate the children and facilitate their adoption processes. As time passes, the boys and girls become adolescence forgotten in a failed system, losing any chance to feel included in